Main Category: Social Science >> Sub Category: Sociology
LUCK, OR CUNNING AS THE MAIN MEANS OF ORGANIC MODIFICATION

Samuel Butler (1835-1902) was a British writer strongly influenced by his New Zealand experiences. He is best known for his utopian satire Erewhon; or, Over the Range (1872) and his posthumous novel The Way of All Flesh (1903). He went up to his father's alma mater, St. John's College, Cambridge, in 1854. Following graduation from Cambridge, Butler lived in a low-income parish in London. In September 1859 he emigrated to New Zealand. He wrote about his arrival and his life as a sheep farmer on Mesopotamia Station in A First Year in Canterbury Settlement (1863). Erewhon; or, Over the Range revealed Butler's long interest in Darwin's theories of biological evolution, and in fact Darwin had, like him, visited New Zealand. His close interest in the art of the Sacri Monti is reflected in Alps and Sanctuaries of Piedmont and the Canton Ticino (1881) and Ex Voto: An Account of the Sacro Monte or New Jerusalem at Varallo-Sesia (1888).     

Author Name :Samuel Butler

No Of Visit :227      Posted Comments :

Heroes and Hero Worship

On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History is a book by Thomas Carlyle, published with James Fraser, London, in 1841. It is a collection of six lectures held in May 1840.     

Author Name :Thomas Carlyle

No Of Visit :232      Posted Comments :

Transnationalism

Transnationalism' refers to multiple ties and interactions linking people or institutions across the borders of nation-states. This book surveys the broader meanings of transnationalism within the study of globalization before concentrating on migrant transnational practices. Each chapter demonstrates ways in which new and contemporary transnational practices of migrants are fundamentally transforming social, political and economic structures simultaneously within homelands and places of settlement.     

Author Name :Steven Vertovec

No Of Visit :227      Posted Comments :

Gender, Household and State in Post-Revolutionary Vietnam

This book examines gender in post-revolutionary Vietnam, focusing on gender relations in the family and state since the onset of economic reform in 1986. Drawing on a wide range of primary sources (including surveys, interviews, and responses to film screenings), Jayne Werner demonstrates that despite the formal institution of public gender equality in Vietnam, in practice women do not hold a great deal of power, continuing to defer to men in both the family and the wider community. Contrary to conventional analyses equating liberalisation and decentralisation with a reduced role for the state over social relations, this book argues that gender relations continued to bear the imprint of state gender policies and discourses in the post-socialist state. While the household remained a highly statist sphere, the book also shows that the unequal status of men and women in the family was based on kinship ties that provided the underlying structure of the family and (contrary to resource theory) depended less on their economic contribution than on family norms and conceptions of proper gendered behaviour.     

Author Name :Jayne Werner

No Of Visit :219      Posted Comments :

Young People, New Theatre

Young People, New Theatre is a how-to book; exploring and explaining the process of collaborating creatively with groups of young people across cultural divides.     

Author Name :Noel Greig

No Of Visit :259      Posted Comments :

SEARCH BY CATEGORIES

Arts & Humanities

Science

Social Science

Mathematics

Engineering & Technology

Business & Finance

Media & Entertainment

Sports & Games

General Knowledge

Business Admin and Management

Medical

Travel & Adventure

Society, Entertainment & Lifestyle

MAGAZINES